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AS/A Level Further Mathematics Forum


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Flipped learning

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mrsannakerr 09 June 2013 20:20
Posts5
Joined19/04/12

Hi,

Have been hearing about flipped learning and was wondering if anyone here has tried it And could share their experiences.  I am going to try my first flipped lesson this week with further maths group, topic matrices, using a tedEd flipped learning video.

Would love to hear from people and perhaps get a community going.

Thanks

Anna

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RaySutton 09 June 2013 21:01
Posts232
Joined27/06/06

I knew nothing of this until your post. My research started with http://flippedlearning.org .Interesting.

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mrsannakerr 09 June 2013 22:28
Posts5
Joined19/04/12

Fantastic! Thank you for the link.

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sandy 10 June 2013 10:00
Posts208
Joined18/07/06

So I followed the link and am still no wiser about what Flipped learning is.

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RonnieGeorge 10 June 2013 10:28
Posts15
Joined06/12/07

Hi!  Hooray - others are interested in this too?  I've done loads of research and am intending to flip AS mechanics and AS further Maths (edexcel, C1 C2, M1, FP1, FP2, D1) starting this week - eek!  VERY happy to share ideas and resources with anyone else giving it a go?

The basic premise:

The standard model for teaching maths is a) explain context b) motivate method c) demo method d) students have a go at the method e) go over the one students tried f) students do practice of the basic method g) students given more stretching/slightly less standard questions to try.  Usually we do parts a-e in class then set f-g for homework.

Flipped learning says this is silly (I agree).  The hardest part of this process for students is f (because it's boring) and g (because it's hard) so these are the bits we should do in class.  a-e are not really very cognitively challenging so could easily be done at home via a video lesson.  Furthermore, this method gives students control over when they learn new content and how many times they view it and whether they pause/rewind etc (something they can't do in a traditional lesson).  It's all about making the most of the time we do have in class and also working within the 'generation z' expectations of having instant access to information.

The best way to learn about flipped learning is to spend an hour on youtube having searched for 'flipped learning' or 'flipped classroom' and listen to very happy students and teachers being all evangelical about it.  It's pretty convincing stuff.

My research has led to the following ideas so far (rather jumbled so far sorry and not tried and tested until later this week...)

  • ideally students prefer videos made by their own teacher.  I have tried using the smart board, a 'flip' video camera and 'explain everything' for the ipad.  I also recommend another video (usually from youtube) so the students get another perspective and a chance to consolidate the learning.
  • videos with one teacher explaining are less watchable than videos with two teachers or a student and a teacher interacting.  My latest videos are of me teaching a student or a fellow teacher.
  • video watching should not be passive.  To avoid this I have made booklets to accompany the videos which students fill in.  Sometimes by copying the example from the video, sometimes by pausing the video when instructed and having a go themselves then un-pausing the video to check their answers
  • videos should ideally be 5-8 minutes (this is soooooo hard, some of mine ended up 30 minutes!)
  • in class the teacher must NOT be tempted to re-teach the material.  We are there to facilitate their skill development and understanding through clevery chosen tasks (THIS IS THE HARD BIT FOR ME!!)

sorry that was a bit of a long reply I'll shut up now and get back to my planning!  On thursday (in theory) my stuents will come in already knowing how to do bubble sort, quick sort, bin packing and binary search.  So what do I do in the lesson?!..... exciting times :)

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sandy 10 June 2013 11:45
Posts208
Joined18/07/06

Brilliant - thank you Ronnie.

My issue with all of the above is the opportunity for investigative, exploratory and active learning.

I DON'T want my students to have 'learnt' how to do a bubble sort - which mine would do from the textbook, Khan academy or FMSP ppt if I asked them - it's what we call independent learning (I won't be making videos anytime soon!)

In the lesson we model the different activities using ourselves, pictures (I have a set of children's animal cards that we sort) and 'packing' various different size blocks into cardboard 'bins'.

We discuss efficient methods and then come up with the algorithms ourselves.

Homework consists of the straightforward questions and making any notes they want to (again lots of these they pick up from the internet, some from previous students on the school VLE). We then spend the lessons looking at the challenging questions - either individually but more ussually in groups of 2/3. With D1 I also use lots of real life examples - particularly later on when they have more algorithms to draw upon.

 

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RonnieGeorge 10 June 2013 12:23
Posts15
Joined06/12/07

Hi Sandy, I agree - I am wary of throwing the baby out with the bathwater, losing all the investigation etc I've brought in over the last few years and accidentally going back to (virtual) chalk and talk. 

According to 'the internet', the flipped learning model is an exciting opportunity to improve sudents' independent learning skills and give them more ownership over their learning because their homework becomes about learning and exploring rather than consolidating the learning which they got from our lessons.  But as I say I am starting this on Thursday so at the moment this is all theory for me! 

I was hoping to see it in action in a sixth form before trying it out but so far I havent managed to find anyone who is using it.  Loads in colleges/universities America, loads in primary/secondary schools in the UK, but no colleges in the UK that I could find (it might just be me but my sector always seems to be last to the pedagogical party...) 

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RonnieGeorge 13 June 2013 09:51
Posts15
Joined06/12/07

UPDATE!  That was great!  They all came in having completed the flipped learning tasks I'd set.  On their desks was a mission - in teams, to set the hardest bin pack/binary search/bubble sort/quick sort they could come up with for the opposing team.  They had 20 minutes do that (some excellent discussions about how they could structure a bubble/quick sort to force the most number of passes) while I chatted to them, found out their names and answered individual questions they had about the topics.  They then completed each other's questions as a race then tried to find mistakes in the other team's work. 

Imagine doing a traditional lesson for 1 hour then setting a 2 hour homework (which you're not going to mark), compared with this way.  I believe they are further ahead with their understanding of these topics and ability to complete the algorithms plus I know exactly who the strongest and weakest members of the group are because I was able to spend an hour watching them work. 

I asked them what they thought of the flipped approach and they were 100% overwhelmingly positive, saying they much preferred learning new things at home and having lesson time to practice and ask questions.

I think I might end up being one of those flipped learning evangelists on youtube.....

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clairepretty 21 June 2013 20:11
Posts17
Joined25/06/10

I've been experimenting with flipped learning since Christmas across ks3 and 4 and genuinely think it is powerful if you train the pupils correctly. It's definitely harder with lower ability as they are less relable at watching a clip before the lesson and with the more able there is a temptation for them to skip the clip part and just try the practice sheet. I've overcome the second by giving them an observation sheet to make notes on as they watch and insist they hand it in. It takes time to embed and I don't use it all the time but I do think in time pupils will become more independent.

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Colleen 21 June 2013 21:07
Posts213
Joined27/06/06

Thinking higher ability now - 

But if they can do the exercise why should they watch a clip? Some of these videos are too slow for able learners.

I really like David Smith's site, the reason I like it is the choice it offers - watch the video / read the transcript / or head staright for the exercises.

 

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