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Primary heads explain the success of teaching for mastery


Created on 12 June 2018 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 12 June 2018 by ncetm_administrator

In new additions to the NCETM website, headteachers at two different primary schools explain how working with their local Maths Hub on teaching for mastery has transformed maths attainment in their school.

  • In a new video interview, Louise George, headteacher of Walford Primary School, Ross-on-Wye, describes how her Year 2 and Year 5 teachers took part in a Work Group run by the Salop and Herefordshire Maths Hub in 2016-2017, which she described as outstanding training. The results were extremely pleasing. In summer 2017, our KS2 ‘expected’ results went up from 60% to 80%, and our ‘greater depth’ rose from 5% to 35%. Ofsted inspectors also noted (July 2017) the high-quality training that staff had received, which ensured they were able to implement the demands of the maths curriculum.
  • A similarly transformative story is told in a new podcast episode, an interview with Helen Hastilow, headteacher of Slade Primary School in Birmingham, where between 70% and 80% of children arrive in nursery or Reception at below age-related expectations. A Mastery Specialist, trained by the NCETM in conjunction with Central Maths Hub, she has worked at Slade for two years and played a key role in the raising of attainment. Over the first year, we saw a 10% increase in maths attainment across the school as a whole, which in a school of 400 is a real achievement. One element of what’s changed is a teacher-led session every afternoon run by class teachers for those children who did not grasp the maths in the morning lesson. We have a mantra that no child leaves the school gates at the end of the day without having a level of understanding of the maths concept dealt with on that day.

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