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National Curriculum: Fractions (including decimals and percentages) Year 5 - Making Connections


Created on 15 October 2013 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 17 January 2014 by ncetm_administrator

Making Connections

Teachers should use every relevant subject to develop pupils’ mathematical fluency. Confidence in numeracy and other mathematical skills is a precondition of success across the national curriculum.

Teachers should develop pupils’ numeracy and mathematical reasoning in all subjects so that they understand and appreciate the importance of mathematics.

(National Curriculum in England Framework Document, September 2013, p10)

Connections within Mathematics

Fractions, decimals and percentages are used in many other areas of mathematics.

When converting units of measure, children need a good understanding of decimals, e.g. converting cm to m, g to kg etc.

Children should also be required to use fractions and percentages when interpreting and evaluating data.

Fractions may be used when describing turns.

Making connections to this topic in adjacent year groups

Year 4

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise and show, using diagrams, families of common equivalent fractions
  • count up and down in hundredths; recognise that hundredths arise when dividing an object by one hundred and dividing tenths by ten.
  • solve problems involving increasingly harder fractions to calculate quantities, and fractions to divide quantities, including non-unit fractions where the answer is a whole number
  • add and subtract fractions with the same denominator
  • recognise and write decimal equivalents of any number of tenths or hundredths
  • recognise and write decimal equivalents to ¼, ½, ¾
  • find the effect of dividing a one- or two-digit number by 10 and 100, identifying the value of the digits in the answer as ones, tenths and hundredths
  • round decimals with one decimal place to the nearest whole number
  • compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to two decimal places
  • solve simple measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals to two decimal places

Year 6

  • use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination
  • compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1
  • add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions
  • multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form [for example, ½, × ¼, = ⅛,]
  • divide proper fractions by whole numbers [for example, ⅓ ÷ 2 = ⅙]
  • associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents [for example, 0.375] for a simple fraction [for example, ⅜ ]
  • identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to three decimal places
  • multiply one-digit numbers with up to two decimal places by whole numbers
  • use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to two decimal places
  • solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy
  • recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages, including in different contexts

Cross-curricular and real life connections

Learners will encounter fractions, decimals and percentages in:

Measurement – when calculating measures for recipes, calculating journey times and fuel consumption

Money – working out the result of sales offers, tips/gratuities on bills, comparing prices

Statistics – interpreting and evaluating data e.g. 19% of the world’s population lives in China


 


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