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Algebra


Created on 09 January 2014 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 30 June 2014 by ncetm_administrator

Algebra

This suite of videos addresses the demands of the New Curriculum to introduce formal algebra into KS2.This builds on pupils on the firm foundation that pupils have in arithmetic.

You may find it useful to download the videos to your own device, using the links given beneath each video. If you encounter any problems, please contact us.

 

Algebra - Key Stage 1

Earlsfield Y2 - look at ’missing numbers’

Reasoning algebraically and finding unknowns

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

 

Algebra - Key Stage 2

Earlsfield Y6 - equations and substitution

Reasoning about equations

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Extending reasoning about equations

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Expressing missing number problems algebraically

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Using algebra to solve problems

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Reasoning algebraically to solve problems

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

 

Algebra - Key Stage 3

Bolingbroke Y7 - factorising

Expressing areas algebraically

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Reasoning algebraically using manipulatives

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Linking images and expressions in algebra

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Leads towards factorising

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

Students create expressions that factorise

Download the accompanying PowerPoint slides.

This video can also be watched on Vimeo, the video hosting site, where it is also possible to download a copy for your own use.

 

National Curriculum Resource Tool - Year 6 Algebra Videos

Further examples of videos to support the teaching of year 6 algebra can be found in our National Curriculum Resource Tool.

 
 

 


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Comments

 


12 September 2016 16:20
Jonathan_Gadd in answer to your question, some of the resources were made using Smart notebook 10, but the "Fruit Box" resources were made using "Maths Pack 3" - made by Primary Games.
By mroakley
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29 December 2015 21:51
where were the resources (oranges, lemons and pears problems) from? Or were they made by the teacher?
29 December 2015 20:27
where were the resources (oranges, lemons and pears problems) from? Or were they made by the teacher?
29 December 2015 18:02
Apologies Jonathan I am unsure. They may have been developed by the teacher
29 December 2015 17:52
where were the resources (oranges, lemons and pears problems) from? Or were they made by the teacher?
15 June 2014 11:38
One small but critical point is that the letter does not represent the 'object' itself but a number.It is vital that teachers make this point explicitly if we are to avoid 'fruit salad' algebra where a stands for apple and b stands for banana. The use of the bar model heuristic in the lessons leading up to this video (as in the one with Y2 and missing quantities when shopping) can help to give children a visual approach to those simple problems as well as laying the foundations for dealing with unknown quantities being represented in an algebraic form. Bernie Westacott
By bjwestacott
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02 May 2014 13:18
We can't always avoid children engaging with "ideas that have to be unlearnt later" [ruthp], as, for example, in 'multiplication makes bigger'. And we can easily come out with such ideas in the heat of the moment, as when the teacher states that "the square, the triangle and the hexagon must mean different numbers to each other" [Algebra Key Stage 2, Reasoning about equations, 01.24 mins]. However, I think it is important, as teachers at least, that we realise that this provides a restricted view of algebra. It would mean that a relation like y = x is undefined! It also promotes the idea that algebraic symbols represent specific unknowns rather than variables.

The idea that different symbols can't represent the same number is quite persistent. We [CSMS and ICCAMS] used this item [from Collis] with representative samples of students in the 1970s and in 2008/9.

When is the following true, always, never, or sometimes? L+M+N=L+P+N.

For our Year 9 samples, the percentage of students correctly stating 'sometimes, when M=P' was only 25% in 1976 and only 17% in 2008/9.

I don't know how easily children's thinking can be 'moved on', but it might help if we concentrated more on exploring general relations than on solving equations (which, it could be said, the teacher in the video was trying to do).
07 April 2014 08:46
Yes the shapes could of course have the same value. I think the teacher was trying to avoid the misconception that sometimes happens where the shapes are the same but are given different values, so where triangle plus triangle equals 8 the value of the triangle is fixed at 4, (it cannot have a value of 6 and 2) as they both have to have the same value, as they are the same shape. No lesson is perfect, or covers every thing. In another lesson these things could be addressed and the children's thinking moved on. This could be a useful point for discussion in a CPD session, I will consider putting it into te PPT if its not already there. Thankyou for your comment
06 April 2014 10:55
Very interesting video but I always worry about introducing ideas that have to be unlearnt later. Why can't the shapes have the same value? Why couldn't they all equal 1 or 0?
By ruthp
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02 April 2014 22:35
Really interesting to see how teacher broke down the learning into scaffolded learning episodes. great for primary teachers to see progression in using rods as rectangular arrays. Not seen enough in primary practice.
By barbaracarr
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18 February 2014 10:01
This page has now been linked from the Algebra YR6 > Video page where further links to external video material can be found.
17 February 2014 17:15
It would be good if these videos were also accessible through the National Curriculum Resources:

Resources > Microsites > The National Curriculum for Mathematics > Algebra > Algebra YR6 > Video
By mroakley
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