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Activity 2: Knowing the requirements


Created on 29 April 2014 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 13 May 2014 by ncetm_administrator

Activity 2: Knowing the requirements

This activity provides a structured approach to exploring the aims, structure, terminology and expectations of the new programmes of study for mathematics. To study this aspect in more depth, the ‘take it further’ activities suggest ways to explore the specific content of the programmes of study in more detail.

Structure

The first two pages of ‘National Curriculum in England: mathematics programmes of study’ explain the purpose of study and aims of mathematics.

In pairs:
Ask pairs to discuss and write down five reasons why pupils study mathematics.

As a team:
Compare the responses with the ‘purpose of study’ and ‘aims’ in the document.

These two pages also explain the expectations for use of information and communication technology (ICT), spoken language, the school curriculum and attainment targets. Ensure staff appreciate that although the programmes of study are set out year-by-year for Key Stages 1 and 2, schools are however,

‘only required to teach the relevant programme by the end of the key stage. Within each key stage, schools therefore have the flexibility to introduce content earlier or later than set out in the programme of study.’
(National curriculum in England: mathematics programmes of study)

Terminology

In groups:
Ask your team to compare the attainment target language of the 2014 curriculum with existing national curriculum documents. What is the same? What’s different? (For example, do we still have ‘Handling data’, ‘Using and Applying’, ‘Shape, Space and Measures’ sections?)

As a team:
Feedback responses and ensure consistency of understanding of the new terminology:

Key Stage 1 Lower Key Stage 2 Upper Key Stage 2 Key Stage 3
Number - number and place value Number
Number - addition and subtraction Number – addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
Number - multiplication and division
Number - fractions Number - fractions (including decimals) Number - fractions (including decimals) Number - fractions (including decimals and percentages)
  Algebra Algebra
  Ratio and proportion Ratio, proportion and rates of change
Measurement Geometry and Measures
Geometry - properties of shapes
Geometry - position and direction
  Probability
  Statistics Statistics

 

Discussion point: Using and applying

  • Why is there no longer a ‘Using and Applying’ section?

This is a very important opportunity to:
a) reiterate two of the aims of the 2014 National Curriculum:

‘The national curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.’
(National curriculum in England: mathematics programmes of study)
 

b) stress the need for these aims to permeate the day to day provision of mathematics (see Activity 4: Designing a scheme of work)

Expectations

Now raise awareness that although the Key Stage 1 and 2 programmes of study are year-by-year, they are grouped into the phases ‘Key Stage 1, ‘Lower Key Stage 2’ and ‘Upper Key Stage 2’.

In groups:
Ask your team to name five aspects of mathematics that they feel are important to develop conceptual understanding in, and to become fluent in, during any of:

  • Key Stage 1
  • Lower Key Stage 2
  • Upper Key Stage 2
  • Key Stage 3

As a team:
Compare responses with the holistic descriptors:

Finally, discuss the following excerpt with your team:

‘The expectation is that the majority of pupils will move through the programmes of study at broadly the same pace. However, decisions about when to progress should always be based on the security of pupils’ understanding and their readiness to progress to the next stage. Pupils who grasp concepts rapidly should be challenged through being offered rich and sophisticated problems before any acceleration through new content. Those who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier material should consolidate their understanding, including through additional practice, before moving on.’
(National curriculum in England: mathematics programmes of study)

Take it further:

The following activities are useful to help teachers explore the differences in the content and expectations of the programmes of study for key stages 1 and 2 (year-by-year structure) and key stage 3 programme (grouped by subject content)

In pairs:
Name the strand and year group for a group of randomly chosen 2014 National Curriculum statements such as:

  • multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form
  • record, describe and analyse the frequency of outcomes of simple probability experiments involving randomness, fairness, equally and unequally likely outcomes, using appropriate language and the 0-1 probability scale
  • recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12
  • add and subtract one-digit and two-digit numbers to 20, including zero

Solution:

  • multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form (Year 6 - Fraction, decimals and percentages)
  • record, describe and analyse the frequency of outcomes of simple probability experiments involving randomness, fairness, equally and unequally likely outcomes, using appropriate language and the 0-1 probability scale (KS3 - Probability)
  • recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12 (Year 4 Number: Multiplication and division
  • add and subtract one-digit and two-digit numbers to 20, including zero (Year 1 – Number: Addition and Subtraction)

In pairs:
Use these bar charts to explore the range and content of the statements for different strands in different key stages. For example:

a) Fractions, decimals and percentages

fractions, decimals and percentages
Year group

This bar chart emphasises the difference in the number of statements in a particular strand.

Warning: Depending on the nature of the statements, this may or may not mean that less curriculum time is needed to develop conceptual understanding in a year group for a particular strand.

b) Geometry – Position and Direction

geometry position and direction
Year group

This bar chart emphasises that strands do not have statements for particular year groups, for example, Year 3.

c) Statistics

statistics
Year group

This bar chart emphasises the reduced number of statements in some strands and hence potentially less curriculum time compared to current programmes of study.

Ask pairs to analyse other strands, make a presentation to the team and discuss the implications.

 

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Comments

 


08 June 2018 15:56
Sorry, but it's not. However, you're very welcome to do a screenshot.
08 June 2018 15:15
Yes I'd like to know the same as above please? Thanks.
By LaFeen
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05 June 2014 07:20
Is the diagram used in the 'team terminology' available as a PDF or jpeg? It makes a really useful overview of the curriculum.
By j9allen
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