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Primary Magazine Issue 104: Schools on Teaching for Mastery Programme report rising attainment


Created on 25 September 2018 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 26 September 2018 by ncetm_administrator

 

Primary Magazine Issue 104'Numberblocks' logo
 

Schools on Teaching for Mastery Programme report rising attainment

Three years into the Maths Hubs/NCETM Teaching for Mastery Programme in primary schools, and many schools are communicating positive impact on results.

Teachers are telling us that their pupils are more engaged with maths: it’s a huge boost for schools when this is matched with improved SATs results. Some turn to Twitter to share their success and we have been picking up some of these stories over the summer.

More than 500 schools now have a Mastery Specialist, trained as part of an NCETM/Maths Hubs programme. Among them is William Morris Primary School, Banbury, which works with GLOW Maths Hub. This tweet emerged highlighting the school’s SATs results:

Teachers involved in the Mastery Specialist Programme have been telling us from the outset how excited they are by the impact in their classrooms: improvements in children’s confidence and enjoyment, and evolving depth in their understanding.

However, schools have had to be a little more tentative in trumpeting improvements in KS2 results based on a single year’s data. Now some schools are able to look at two or three consecutive years of data and are finding results encouraging. Drybrook Primary School, Gloucestershire (GLOW Maths Hub) was another…this was their message in July:

Well over two thousand schools have now been part of year-long Teaching for Mastery Work Groups, led by Mastery Specialists. These three told of their SATs success on Twitter:

Annunciation RC Junior School, in Barnet (London Central and NW Maths Hub) – their Maths results in 2018 were 96% Age Related Expectations, up from 81% in 2017:

Margaretting C of E Primary School, Essex (Matrix Essex and Herts Maths Hub):

Hayes Park School, Hayes, Middlesex (Bucks, Berks and Oxon Maths Hub):

Other schools have been involved in some of the many other professional development Work Groups run by hubs around a teaching for mastery theme. For example, Oakfield Primary School in Hull were involved in the first project to trial textbooks to support teaching for mastery and have since been involved in other Yorkshire and the Humber Maths Hub projects. They emailed the hub, who then tweeted their good news:

We are often asked about evidence of the impact of teaching for mastery at national level, and this is something that is being collected and carefully monitored at the NCETM. However, because schools have been encouraged to decide for themselves how and when to introduce a teaching for mastery approach, this has happened differently in different schools. Some schools made the decision to introduce teaching for mastery across all year groups whilst others decided on a more staggered approach. This has meant that the obvious data to collect – comparative KS2 results – may not, in some schools, reflect a year group that has been learning with a teaching for mastery approach. In the meantime, we are hugely encouraged by the individual success stories that many schools are sharing publicly.

Want to bang your drum? Why not share your maths SATs results this year in the Comments box below?

Interested in knowing more about the NCETM/Maths Hubs Teaching for Mastery Programme? Your local hub may still have places available for schools to work with local Mastery Specialists this year or next. There is also a wealth of information and resources in our mastery section.

 

 
 
 

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