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Secondary


Created on 08 April 2020 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 18 May 2020 by ncetm_administrator


Learning activities and games - secondary

We have divided these resources into three categories:

Featured resource

Maths Kitchen logo

Maths Kitchen offer short video lessons and some interactive questions for GCSE students. Solutions are given. Doing one of these lessons every now and then would be a good way to keep your child’s mathematical thinking ticking over.

It would be useful to know broadly what GCSE grade your child is aiming for, or predicted to get by their teacher.

Daily lessons

Mathematics Mastery

What age range is this aimed at?
School years 7, 8 and 9 (the first three years of secondary school).

What exactly is the resource?
A five-week pack of maths learning, covering a range of topics. For each week, there’s one session for each of four days. Every session consists of ‘tasks’ designed to take 20 minutes, and ‘exercises’ designed to take 40 minutes. Answers are provided.

What do I need to know before I use this?
If your child is also working on something being sent home from school, it might help to know what the topic is and choose a session from this pack that is on the same topic. Your child will need pen and paper to write down the answers to the exercises.

How should I use this?
Each week’s worth of lessons covers a different area of maths. So, your child could work through them in order. But the weeks don’t have to be done in order. So your child could start with the week they feel most comfortable with.

When should I use this?
Your child could dip into this at any time. But it’d be better if each week’s four sessions are done within a reasonably short space of time—four or five days, maybe.

How can I access this?
Free to access. To find the sessions for secondary-age children, scroll down to find ‘Key Stage 3 resources.’

White Rose Maths Home Learning

White Rose Home Learning logo

What age range is this aimed at?
This is aimed at school years 7 and 8 (the first two years of secondary school), and all the primary school years.

What exactly is the resource?
For each year group, there are sequences of five lessons, which could be done one every day for a week. Over time these will build, so that there are several weeks’ worth of lessons that a child could do. Each lesson consists of an animated PowerPoint (a video of approximately 2-3 minutes) with an activity sheet for the child to complete, and an answer sheet.

What do I need to know before I use this?
It would be useful to know which maths topics your child has studied already, and which are new. If you can see your child’s books, reports or any other information about what they’ve been learning this year, that may help you. Or you could just ask your child whether a lesson looks like it’s about right for them, too easy or too hard.

How should I use this?
You could watch the animated PowerPoint together, pausing it every now and then to ask questions. Or your child could watch it alone. Your child could then complete the worksheet independently or with your help, and you could mark it together. These resources are very straightforward and easy for a parent to follow and use.

When should I use this?
These are designed as daily lessons, with one a day Monday to Friday. At the end of March, White Rose said they’d be adding a week’s worth of lessons ‘for the next few weeks.’

How can I access this?
Some of the content is free to access via the White Rose website, in the Home Learning section. Premium content requires a paid subscription. Many of the worksheets associated with the video lessons require payment. Some of the content which was initially free has now become paid-for.

Videos and activities

AMSP post-16 resources

AMSP logo

What age range is this aimed at?
These resources are for post-16 students studying AS/A level Maths, Core Maths and Further Maths.

What exactly is the resource?
The Advanced Maths Support Programme (AMSP) have collated a range of student-friendly resources for those studying maths at post-16. These include links to the Integral resources, tasks and activities, and self-directed online courses.

What do I need to know before I use this?
Your child can use these resources independently. As long as he/she is aware of the topics he/she has covered, these resources can be selected and studied by your child without parental input.

How should I use this?
Your child will be able to decide which activities, courses and learning would best suit them. It is usually a good idea to study a subject for as many hours as they would have been studying in school or college.

When should I use this?
Many of these activities provide daily practice, but your child will be able to determine how often they need to study particular maths topics.

How can I access this?
The AMSP site is free to access, as are the sites they link to, although some require registration.

Corbett Maths

Corbettmaths logo

What age range is this aimed at?
School years 9, 10 and 11 (14 to 16 year olds)

What exactly is the resource?
A collection of hundreds of maths topics, each consisting of a short video lesson, with associated questions. Answers are supplied.

What do I need to know before I use this?
All GCSE maths topics are covered. If you look at the ‘5-a-day’ section of the website, there are activities graded according to degree of difficulty. ‘Foundation’ are the easiest questions; ‘Higher Plus’ are the hardest.

How should I use this?
You or your child could choose a particular topic area, and do one lesson a day, or mix and match so that all types of maths areas are covered.

When should I use this?
This could complement anything being sent home by your child’s school, providing extra practice if your child wants it.

How can I access this?
Free to access.

Maths Kitchen

Maths Kitchen logo

What age range is this aimed at?
School years 10 and 11 (14 to 16 year olds)

What exactly is the resource?
Short video lessons and some interactive questions to try. Solutions are given.

What do I need to know before I use this?
You need to know broadly what GCSE grade your child is aiming for, or predicted to get by their teacher. There’s a ‘grades’ column on the left-hand side of the page to guide you to the appropriate level of activity.

How should I use this?
Together with your child, look through the list of topics available for the appropriate grades, and choose one that looks promising. If it works, you could choose a related topic but with a higher grade rating, or another topic altogether.

When should I use this?
Doing one of these every now and then would be a good way to keep their mathematical thinking ticking over.

How can I access this?
Free to access.

One-offs and games

MathSphere

A free collection of printable board, counter and dice games, including how to play instructions, equipment needed and coloured layouts.

These games are useful if you have limited access to computers/tablets for your child(ren) but do have printing facilities. The games are suitable for a range of ages, from 7 up to 13 or 14. A useful rule is that if your child understands it and enjoys it, then it will provide good maths practice. For some of the games, parents might need to read the rules to help get children started.

Free

MEI apps and games

MEI logo

What age range is this aimed at?
Secondary students (age 11 upwards, including sixth form students).

What exactly is the resource?
Maths in Education and Industry (MEI) offer a variety of online apps and games designed to support students’ mathematical learning and understanding.

What do I need to know before I use this?
You need to know the level of maths your child is studying (GCSE, preparation for A level, or A level) to select the most appropriate app(s).

How should I use this?
Your child can download the app(s) to their phone or tablet. He/she will be able to determine which are most suitable to complement his/her mathematical studies. If you are not sure which app to start with, Sumaze! and Factris are both excellent and popular.

When should I use this?
These apps could be used daily to supplement a child’s maths learning. They do not replace the learning that a school or college provides, but are designed to complement and enhance it.

How can I access this?
The apps are available via the App Store (Apple) and the Google Play App Store (Android). Most are free but some have a small charge.

NRICH Solving Together

What age range is this aimed at?
This is aimed at school year 7 (11 and 12 year olds) but there’d be no harm in using it with older children.

What exactly is the resource?
Six, separate problems designed so that a parent and a child can work together to find a solution. NRICH is an established maths organisation, well known to maths teachers. This is a small section of their very extensive website. NRICH have also created a secondary Maths at Home feature packed with activities and games suitable for children to work on at home without a teacher.

What do I need to know before I use this?
It’d be helpful to watch the short general guidance video for parents before you decide on something to do together. The video stresses that you don’t need to be good at maths yourself to try to tackle a problem with your child.

How should I use this?
Although the tasks were originally designed for homework, following work done in lessons, they can just as easily be done on their own, without any input or prompting from school.

When should I use this?
Clearly, this is an activity that needs a parent and a child to be engaged at the same time. So, it’s up to you to choose if and when there’s half an hour or so to tackle one together.

How can I access this?
Free to access.

Wild Maths

What age range is this aimed at?
All ages up to 16

What exactly is the resource?
Games activities and stories that help children to think mathematically and creatively.

What do I need to know before I use this?
This site consists largely of open-ended, investigative tasks, encouraging children to think creatively about their maths. You will not find self-contained exercises with answers here. The link above takes you to a page where most of your potential questions about how to use this site are answered.

How should I use this?
Browse through the different activities in the ‘Pathways’ area of the site and find one of the titles that instantly sparks some interest in your child. And then just suggest they have a go!

When should I use this?
These activities are designed to complement more formal learning of maths concepts. So they could be suggested to your child as something additional to any work sent home by their school.

How can I access this?
Free to access.

 

 

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