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Teachers Talking Theory: In Action - Sue Rayner


This page has been archived. The content was correct at the time of original publication, but is no longer updated.
Created on 07 May 2008 by ncetm_administrator
Updated on 20 October 2008 by ncetm_administrator

Teachers Talking Theory

 
Teachers Talking Theory: In Action is a set of professional development resources which comprise of video clips and associated activities. The materials can stimulate discussion and experimentation and are designed to be used in many different scenarios.
 
Sue Rayner, Yeo Moor Infants School
Themes
 
The use of stories to stimulate problem solving
 
Encouraging rich child-initiated activity

Sue is interested in ways of tapping in to her children’s interests in order that they become fully involved in the mathematics they are doing. She regularly uses books to stimulate mathematical activity and often experiments with the idea of a “letter to the class” as a way of introducing a problem.

She is also interested in the relationship between carefully chosen resources planned by the teacher and the richness and individuality of child-initiated activity.
            
 
In this video, Sue is reading Monkey Puzzle, by Julia Donaldson, illustrated by Axel Scheffler, published by Macmillan Children's Books, London, UK. 
    
 
    
 

Probes & Prompts

 

What does the use of a story book add to the experience of problem solving for these young children? How can the use of literature be used to stimulate mathematical work for learners of all ages?

 

Discuss how the use of a letter could stimulate learners in your class to engage in purposeful mathematical enquiry. What letters could be written arising from some of your children’s favourite books to stimulate some mathematics?

 
Click here to view more probes and prompts for use with this video

Additional Resources
 
Information about Numicon

 
See Linked Mathemapedia Entry

 

The use of stories to stimulate problem solving in young children
 
Find out more about ways of working with these materials with other colleagues  

Browse Teachers Talking Theory:
In Action
Teachers Talking Theory: In Action Homepage
James Knightbridge, Blandford School
Sue Briggs, The Castle School
Tom Rainbow, Ivybridge Community College
Debbie Weible, Oldway Primary School
Chris Slaughter, Kingsbridge Primary School
Tim Browse, Teyfant Community School

 

The importance of considering actions in word problems

 

The importance of children drawing their own pictures 

 

Mathematics as a creative discipline

 

Students feeling positive about how they learn

 

Children making their own decisions when solving problems

 

Questioning to encourage deep mathematical thinking

 


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Comments

 


03 February 2015 21:07
I really liked the idea of introducing mathematical problem solving through stories. I really enjoy reading children's stories myself and I think I can really create something very exciting for the children in my classroom in this way.

Also, the idea of incorporating a letter from one of the characters from the story is a great idea. It will just give it a purpose and make it much more fun and interesting.
By Bless123
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03 February 2015 21:06
I really liked the idea of introducing mathematical problem solving through stories. I really enjoy reading children's stories myself and I think I can really create something very exciting for the children in my classroom in this way.

Also, the idea of incorporating a letter from one of the characters from the story is a great idea. It will just give it a purpose and make it much more fun and interesting.
By Bless123
         Alert us about this comment  
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