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National Curriculum - Statistics : Key Stage 1 : Mathematics Content Knowledge


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Key Stage 1
National Curriculum - Statistics
Question 1 of 6

1. 1. How confident are you that you can find opportunities in subjects other than mathematics where it is helpful to:

a. a: use and apply skills in handling data?


Example

The whole world is filled with data. People produce charts and tables to support their observations and theories. Pupils can begin by looking at simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables to see what information they can find from each chart and/or table.

A tally chart has information about the number of times something has happened. For example:

Here is a tally chart of who has blue eyes, brown eyes or green eyes in a class at a school:

Eye Colour Tally Frequency
Blue llll llll l 11
Brown llll llll llll 15
Green llll 4

The key feature of the tally chart is the way to record the numbers:

l Means 1
ll Means 2
lll Means 3
llll Means 4
llll Means 5

In this way when you are looking to count up how many things are in each group then it is easy to ‘tally’ by counting in fives.

In a pictogram appropriate pictures, symbols or icons are used to represent objects. For large numbers one symbol can represent a number of objects and a part of a symbol then represents a fraction of that number.

Here is a pictogram showing the number of different birds seen in the school garden on one day:

Pictogram showing the number of birds in the school garden on Wednesday

two birds Represents 2 birds

Robin two birds      
Blackbird two birds two birds two birds  
Blue tit two birds two birds    
Sparrow two birds two birds two birds two birds

In a bar chart, bars of equal width represent different categories. The lengths of the bars represent the frequency of each category. There are gaps between each bar. The bars can be either horizontal or vertical.

Bar chart to show the number of pencils pupils had in their pencil cases on Tuesday morning

bar chart

It is also useful to collect information in a simple table.

This usually contains numerical information:

Table to show the number of pupils favourite type of reading book:

Horror Adventure Sci-Fi
9 7 15

 

What this might look like in the classroom

Give pupils a number of different representations of data and ask them to make some correct statements about the information.

For example:

Example A

Here is a tally chart of who has blue eyes, brown eyes or green eyes in a class at a school:

Eye Colour Tally Frequency
Blue llll llll l 11
Brown llll llll llll 15
Green llll 4

Possible correct statements might include:

  • Most pupils in the class have brown eyes.
  • Fewest pupils in the class have green eyes.
  • There are 30 pupils in the class.

Example B

Pictogram showing the number of birds in the school garden on Wednesday

two birds Represents 2 birds

Robin two birds      
Blackbird two birds two birds two birds  
Blue tit two birds two birds    
Sparrow two birds two birds two birds two birds
  • There are more sparrows than robins in the garden.
  • There are two more blackbirds than blue tits in the garden.
  • There are six blackbirds in the garden.

Taking this mathematics further

Look at a range of data presented in charts in newspapers, magazines and on the internet. Ask pupils to make correct statements about the information that they can gather from these graphs, charts and tables.

Making connections

Young children begin to collect and record data as an integral part of play−based learning, for example children may keep a tally of a score during a bean−bag game.

As children learn to interpret a range of graphs and charts, this extends their ability to plan and carry out their own research to answer questions of interest and to create their own graphs and charts to support their results.

Initially, children will create charts and graphs using a unit scale. As they develop their skills of counting in equal groups, and as they handle data involving large amounts of data they learn how to draw and read scales that goes up in 2s, 5s, 10s…

Data handling is an important tool that enables learners to analyse information and research questions across the curriculum and in their everyday lives.

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